Forecasting the Future of the World:and its Civilizational-International Relations Francis Fukuyama, Islam, Modernity, and t

​We do not know today how much impact the attitudes of US President Donald Trump and the rise of the far right in the West will have on the hypotheses and optimistic theory of Francis Fukuyama and on the future vision of Samuel Huntingdon, given that Trump and his ilk from the neurotic right in the West have shifted the concepts of the clash of civilizations from the external relations of their countries and “civilization” to relations that have split their societies into two conflicting cultural groups. This, at a time when the political unconscious (to borrow Roger Garaudy's term) of the West regarding the self and the world has practically been exposed. Hence, this paper raises the question of American forecasting of the global future in its civilizational-international relations, particularly from the perspective of Francis Fukuyama and through raising issues of Islam, modernity, and the Arab Spring.

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​We do not know today how much impact the attitudes of US President Donald Trump and the rise of the far right in the West will have on the hypotheses and optimistic theory of Francis Fukuyama and on the future vision of Samuel Huntingdon, given that Trump and his ilk from the neurotic right in the West have shifted the concepts of the clash of civilizations from the external relations of their countries and “civilization” to relations that have split their societies into two conflicting cultural groups. This, at a time when the political unconscious (to borrow Roger Garaudy's term) of the West regarding the self and the world has practically been exposed. Hence, this paper raises the question of American forecasting of the global future in its civilizational-international relations, particularly from the perspective of Francis Fukuyama and through raising issues of Islam, modernity, and the Arab Spring.

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