Future Studies: Problematics and Approaches for Use

After the Second World War, scientific thinking gradually developed a method that was able to forecast possible futures. As a result of the spread of this methodology within the global north and south (albeit to varying extents), it became a widespread and global phenomenon. As a methodology adopted – in whole or in part—worldwide, it came to be developed by thinkers from a variety of backgrounds. Equally, this diversity of backgrounds for the practitioners of forecasting studies led to significant differences in their conceptualization of these approaches. Against this backdrop, this paper examines the field of future studies from the perspective of the problematics of the concept as it developed after WW II, as well as the approaches to its use. The paper aims also to challenge a widespread opposition to futurology and forecasting throughout the Arab world.

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After the Second World War, scientific thinking gradually developed a method that was able to forecast possible futures. As a result of the spread of this methodology within the global north and south (albeit to varying extents), it became a widespread and global phenomenon. As a methodology adopted – in whole or in part—worldwide, it came to be developed by thinkers from a variety of backgrounds. Equally, this diversity of backgrounds for the practitioners of forecasting studies led to significant differences in their conceptualization of these approaches. Against this backdrop, this paper examines the field of future studies from the perspective of the problematics of the concept as it developed after WW II, as well as the approaches to its use. The paper aims also to challenge a widespread opposition to futurology and forecasting throughout the Arab world.

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